Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

Your Connection to Wildlife

Official blog of the Canadian Wildlife Federation Your Connection to Wildlife

A Rube With A View

A blog about ecology and wildlife conservation

The ecosystem services blog

Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

World's diverse ecosystems

Since there is so much life on this planet, it is estimated that 86 percent of organisms have yet to be found. However, because of humans, we can never have the ability to find them all. Biodiversity depletion is becoming more of a concern than we ever imagined. According to researched by maid service Marlborough, MA, half of all species on the planet could become extinct by 2050, which is just 32 years away.
Biodiversity depletion, on the other hand, means the habitats are dying. Either the entire environment is destroyed as a result of human activity — such as deforestation, urban development, and farming — or a large number of key organisms in an ecosystem perish that the ecosystem dies on its own. There are many examples of how human interference can have catastrophic effects for an environment.
We're also seeing a decrease in biodiversity. More than 60% of the planet's biodiversity has been lost in the last five decades, according to estimates.
What causes the demise of these natural ecosystems?
Natural disasters can often bring an ecosystem to its knees. Forest fires, flooding, and volcanic eruptions are all capable of damaging an environment in a particular region. These forms of natural biodiversity loss, on the other hand, are popular — and the world has a plan in place to recover them once the damage has subsided. Some pine tree seeds, for example, will not germinate unless their parent tree has been destroyed in a wildfire.
Those aren't the kinds of biodiversity losses that should bother us.
In the past few decades, human activity has been responsible for the bulk of biodiversity loss. Among the most popular causes are:
Deforestation: When we clear a forest for timber or claim land for cultivation, we are destroying special habitats that cannot be found anywhere else.
Invasive Animals: Species that are introduced into an environment where they have no natural predators will devastate it. Pythons in the Florida Everglades and lionfish in the Gulf of Mexico are good examples of this. The majority of these invasive species can be traced back to human activity.
Pollution: Waste spilled into rivers, chemical runoff from industrial applications, and air pollution from vehicles and factories all have harmful implications.
Climate Change: As the end of the last ice age showed, climate change will occur gradually over millions of years. Climate change, on the other hand, is the product of human activity this time. It's happening too soon, and animals are dying because they can't adapt quickly enough.
Overfishing: Since much of the ocean remains unexplored, it's difficult to put a figure on overfishing, but it's estimated that 60 to 90 percent of the ocean has been overfished or is on the verge of collapse.
Since there are so many of us on the planet today, it's virtually difficult to avoid making an effect on the climate. What would the implications of this depletion of biodiversity be for us?
Humans are inextricably connected to the world around us, as much as we try to keep ourselves isolated from it by constructing roads and houses to shield us from the weather. The loss of biodiversity would have an effect on us as well.
Maria Neira, head of the World Health Organization's Department for the Safety of the Human Environment, put it better than we could. "The health of humans is inextricably related to the health of ecosystems, which provide for many of our most essential needs."
Plants from all over the world are harvested for both modern and traditional medicine. Many of these drugs save lives, but half of these plants could be extinct by 2050.

Born Free is calling for European zoos to phase-out the keeping of giraffe in captivity and instead focus their conservation resources on the protection of giraffe populations in the wild.

The post 5 ways captivity is bad for giraffe wellbeing appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

International wildlife charity, Born Free, shares 20 animal welfare and conservation successes to help spread a little happiness at the end of 2020.

The post Good news for animals! 20 happy wildlife stories from 2020… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

International wildlife charity, Born Free, shares 20 animal welfare and conservation successes to help spread a little happiness at the end of 2020.

The post Good news for animals! 20 happy wildlife stories from 2020… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

My biggest passion going as I bring my 10th year of wildlife blogging to a close, is to pass it on!

The post Concluding my 10th year of blogging… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

I've been thinking that it would be useful to have a calendar of sorts, listing all the important animal and nature-related days that I would like to observe on my blog and social media accounts -- so I made one...

The post Ultimate Guide to Wildlife Days and Nature Campaigns appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

International wildlife charity, Born Free, shares 20 animal welfare and conservation successes to help spread a little happiness at the end of 2020.

The post Good news for animals! 20 happy wildlife stories from 2020… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

On Republic Day 2021 in India, I’m delighted to share this guest blog from Wildlife Blogger Crowd member, Nishand Venugopal, about his incredible experience exploring Ranthambore National Park in search of Tigers and other native wildlife...

The post In search of the Tiger: Guest post by Nishand Venugopal appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

International wildlife charity, Born Free, shares 20 animal welfare and conservation successes to help spread a little happiness at the end of 2020.

The post Good news for animals! 20 happy wildlife stories from 2020… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Whether you're thinking of beginning your plastic-reduced lifestyle as a New Year's Resolution, or are already well on the way to a zero waste existence, it never hurts to see what changes others are making too. I'm pleased to be sharing this guest post from Donald Giddings, Founder of Green Living Zone, in which he demonstrates how reducing in our use of non-essential plastic is something we can all strive to achieve in 2021.

The post Zero-waste revolution: How to Live a Plastic-Free Life appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Our natural world and its wildlife depends upon storytelling. Check out these 100 incredible storytellers who are speaking up for nature, and making the world a better place for wildlife in 2021.

The post 100 Wildlife Bloggers Who are Bettering the World appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Sikkim is one of the richest birding areas of its size anywhere in the world, making it a much loved destination for birders. Find out more...

The post Sikkim in India is one of the world’s best places for birding. This is why. appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

A look at the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the one of the most iconic wild spaces left on our planet; the Maasai Mara.

The post Has Coronavirus changed the face of the Maasai Mara forever? appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

This week is National Tree Week; a celebration to mark the start of the winter tree planting season. And you know what? I really needed that focus today.

The post National Tree Week: plant a tree, start a new life. appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Christmas preparations needn't cost the Earth (and I mean that in the most literal way). I'm sure there are plenty of ways to have a more eco-friendly Christmas, but here are a few of my most easily achieved for starters...

The post 7 simple ways to have an eco-friendly Christmas appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

In this guest post, Grady explores how, despite getting a bad rap, landscape photography images shared on social media have tremendous potential to mobilize conservation efforts and increase awareness of the threats facing our natural landscape.

The post 3 great ways Instagram natural world photography helps conservation appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Introducing Wild Lines' wildlife-themed illustrations. Plus, don't miss your chance to win a free set of Christmas cards! Find out how...

The post Wild Lines: Beautiful wildlife-themed Christmas Cards to spread festive cheer appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Once in a while you hear a story that demonstrates the positive power of social media – and in this case, a network of strangers passionate about lions came together online to help give four lions the chance of a new life.

The post Facebook group rallies to free forgotten lions in Ukraine appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Whether you’re eco-conscious yourself, or buying for someone who appreciates green gifts, I’ve tried to think of gift suggestions that don’t harm the environment in any way, and that also help promote small businesses and wildlife/environmental charities.

The post Top 5 eco-friendly gift ideas appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Introducing Button and Squirt, home of Amazing Animals Fact Cards. I was excited to chat to Ria, the woman behind Button and Squirt to find out about her love of animals, her business journey and her motivations for the brand.

The post Amazing Animals Fact Cards: the perfect gift for kids who love animals appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Animals who are in danger of becoming extinct are endangered animals. This suggests that no more of these creatures on earth will be alive. When there are very few of them left, an animal is deemed endangered or 'threatened'.
According to personal injury lawyer Columbus, OH researched, others are more endangered than others by animals. Scientists categorize the level of risk with a different name to keep track of how a species may be at risk of becoming extinct. The following names vary from the most endangered to the least threatened animals:
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
There are also some animals which exist only in captivity (in a zoo, for example). They are named "extinct in the wild" by these creatures.
What are some of the species that are most endangered?
There are species listed as being Critically Endangered. Here is just a sampling of the list:
Black Rhinoceros - Only a handful of black rhinos are left. In Western Africa, they mostly live. They are often endangered because their horns are destroyed by hunters.
Red Wolf - Originally, the red wolf lived in the Southeast United States. Just a couple of hundred are left, most of them living in captivity.
Others include the Siberian Tiger, the Florida Panther, the California Condor, the Mountain Gorilla, and the Giant Ibis.
The Sea Otter, Loggerhead Sea Turtle, Giant Panda, Blue Whale, Albatross, and Snow Leopard are some of the' endangered species.
The Lion, Cheetah, Hippo, Dingo, Polar Bear, Humpback Whale, and the Macaroni and Royal Penguins have some 'vulnerable species.
How do they protect endangered animals?
Most nations around the world have regulations that preserve endangered species. Killing or harming an endangered or protected animal is also a felony. There are a number of laws in the United States which protect endangered animals. These rules are part of the Endangered Species Act that President Nixon signed into law in 1973. These laws help the animals and their ecosystems to be secure. They also have services called Rehabilitation Plans to help animals heal. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are the key organizations that enforce the laws and help protect the species.
Wildlife or nature parks are also located across the globe. These preserves are large land areas where species are protected and their habitat is protected. Progress on the land is very restricted or completely stopped. Also, hunting is prohibited or illegal. By keeping some of them captive and breeding them in captivity, critically endangered animals are also secured. This helps researchers keep the species alive and helps them to study the animals as well.
Scientists also research animals in the wild to learn what their population could be influenced by. Scientists may be able to help a species of animal survive extinction with good research.

The Woodland Trust launched the Big Climate Fightback in September to give people a simple way to make a difference in the fight against climate change.

The post Why I’m joining the Big Climate Fightback… appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Born Free has launched the Global Nature Recovery Investment Initiative (GNRII) aimed at bringing about the transformative changes needed to protect people and wildlife around the globe.

The post Born Free Launches Global Nature Recovery Investment Initiative appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Have you ever dreamed of taking a safari? Of spotting a distant movement through the binoculars, followed by the shuddering kickstart of a Land Rover engine as you prepare to chase an indistinguishable shadow or glimpse of fur across the grassy landscape… would you believe me if I said you could do just that? In the UK.

The post Why the North Norfolk Safari is the perfect UK staycation appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

It's the kind of Halloween story that naturalists will love! Great Fox-Spiders have been rediscovered after more than 25 years without a UK sighting.

The post Britain’s largest and most endangered spider species rediscovered appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

These lemur-themed masks support one of Madagascar’s leading conservation charities in their innovative mask exchange scheme to help supply face coverings to the world’s poorest.

The post Lemur themed face masks: giving back to the world’s poorest appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

The Ethiopian Wolf (Canis Simensis) is the rarest canid on earth. While the population is in a state of flux, still it is estimated that there are fewer than 500 individuals left in the world, making it the most endangered carnivore in Africa.

The post Ethiopian Wolf: In search of the rarest canid on Earth appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

This autumn, I’m delighted to have been invited to become an honorary Wildlife Angel for the fantastic animal rescue centre and sanctuary; Pet Samaritans. Their Hedgehog Hospital runs all year round, and as hedgehog numbers continue to decline across Britain, they do everything they can to help them. We, the public, can also do our bit help hedgehogs as they prepare for hibernation (usually taking place November – March) and here are a few suggestions for how...

The post 8 easy ways you can help hedgehogs this autumn appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Halloween is just around the corner, so it seems like the ideal time to share this guest post taking a look at 10 Strange Animals You Probably Didn't Know Existed...

The post 10 Strange Animals You Probably Didn’t Know Existed appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Cut Carbon Not Forests campaign has shared a new infographic that tells the story of the UK government’s hypocrisy on forest conservation and climate.

The post The hidden truth behind the UK’s tree-planting hypocrisy appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

More than 70,000 healthy badgers will be shot this autumn, in the government’s largest ever seasonal cull. What's more, the cull will result in the deaths of badgers which have been vaccinated by volunteers in government-funded programmes.

The post National Badger Day: Betrayal in the British countryside appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

The Global Initiative to End Wildlife Crime (EWC) outlined an innovative 'One Health' approach to reforming wildlife trade laws that the group said would eliminate threats to human health by avoiding future devastating wildlife-related pandemics, while helping to stop the decline of ecosystems and reverse the extinction crisis facing wild animals and plants.

The post Wildlife Trade laws must be reformed with ‘One Health’ approach appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Today is World Rivers Day; a celebration of the world's waterways. World Rivers Day was also created to highlight the many values of rivers; increasing public awareness of the threats they face and striving for improved stewardship of rivers around the world.

The post Save the Mighty River on World Rivers Day 2020 appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Meet Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, Founder of Conservation Through Public Health. Gladys works tirelessly to protect gorillas in Uganda from catching human diseases spread through tourism and the use of gorilla ‘scarecrows’ by local communities.

The post World Gorilla Day: Will better public health save Uganda’s gorillas? appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

The Wildlife Blogger Crowd is a positive, uplifting space for wildlife and nature bloggers to share posts, join discussions and support other content creators.

The post Introducing the Wildlife Blogger Crowd appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

This guest blog explores the future of travel as ecotourism, and looks at how -- when viewed as a philosophy for conservation -- this kind of travel and exploration plays a vital role in species conservation. It has perhaps become even more important to look at travel through this lens in the months since the piece was first written.

The post Ecotourism as a Philosophy for Conservation appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

As summer gives way to autumn, I’m beginning to return my attention to my garden. I’ve teamed up with Seedball to offer one lucky winner the chance to win this bundle of Seedball wildlife-themed mixes worth £42 -- perfect for bringing wildlife into your garden.

The post The Best Ways To Bring Pollinators To Your Garden appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

It’s been over 100 days since the UK’s official lockdown began and parents all over the country have been desperately trying to juggle the demands of home-schooling their children.
However, while maths, English and science homework may have stumped some parents, international wildlife charity Born Free is putting the spotlight on a different ‘school’ - The Orangutan Foundation’s Camp in Lamandau Wildlife Reserve in Borneo.

The post Home-schooling with a difference: Orangutans learn life lessons appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Jill Robinson: To the Moon and Back film tells the remarkable story of one woman's inspirational journey to save moon bears through the creation of Animals Asia Foundation. Win a copy of the film!

The post How to Change the World One Moon Bear at a Time appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

International wildlife charity Born Free is calling on the Government to implement a long-overdue review and reform of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981 to significantly raise the standards in the more than 300 licensed zoos in Britain. Find out more...

The post Creature Discomforts: Life in Lockdown appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Ahead of Virtual Birdfair 2020, take a look back at the Next generation conservation debate: Should Nature Work for Us Or Should We Work for Nature?

The post Birdfair: A look back at ‘next generation conservation’ appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

According to the Red List of Threatened Species compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), more than 28,000 species around the world are threatened with extinction. Hazel Harred takes a closer look in this guest post.

The post Endangered Species Around The World guest post appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

It’s been over 100 days since the UK’s official lockdown began and parents all over the country have been desperately trying to juggle the demands of home-schooling their children.
However, while maths, English and science homework may have stumped some parents, international wildlife charity Born Free is putting the spotlight on a different ‘school’ - The Orangutan Foundation’s Camp in Lamandau Wildlife Reserve in Borneo.

The post Home-schooling with a difference: Orangutans learn life lessons appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

After years of uncertainty, England’s first wild breeding population of beavers for 400 years has been given the permanent right to remain in their East Devon river home.

The post GOOD NEWS! Beavers can stay in their Devon home appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

As July draws to a close; our first month of the 'easing of lockdown' here in the UK, it felt like a good time to reflect and share some of the cool things I've been involved in over these last few months, regarding wildlife and conservation communications outside of this blog...

The post Lockdown: live interviews, podcasts, awards and articles appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Fifty years ago, one of the worst atrocities of animal welfare took place. In the largest capture of wild orcas in history, more than 90 of the marine mammals were rounded up in Penn Cove and seven young southern resident killer whales were captured using nets and explosives, then sold to aquariums. Only one of those abducted on 8th August 1970 is still alive; Lolita.

The post Lolita the orca: 50 years in a tank appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Ilena Zanella won a prestigious Whitley Award in 2019 for her work with scalloped hammerhead sharks.

The post National Geographic Kids meets shark hero Ilena Zanella appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

I'm so excited finally get to see my Shamwari Diaries project completed, and hold in my hands a beautifully printed, full colour, 360-page copy of my Shamwari travel diary from my days volunteering at the private game reserve, back when I was 18 years old.

The post Shamwari Diaries in print! appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

It’s been over 100 days since the UK’s official lockdown began and parents all over the country have been desperately trying to juggle the demands of home-schooling their children.
However, while maths, English and science homework may have stumped some parents, international wildlife charity Born Free is putting the spotlight on a different ‘school’ - The Orangutan Foundation’s Camp in Lamandau Wildlife Reserve in Borneo.

The post Home-schooling with a difference: Orangutans learn life lessons appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

This past week, the Eastern Daily Press was kind enough to dedicate an entire double page spread to sharing our lockdown garden story.

The post Eastern Daily Press newspaper celebrates our lockdown garden appeared first on Kate on Conservation.