Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

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Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

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Lemur themed face masks: giving back to the world’s poorest

These lemur-themed masks support one of Madagascar’s leading conservation charities in their innovative mask exchange scheme to help supply face coverings to the world’s poorest.

The post Lemur themed face masks: giving back to the world’s poorest appeared first on Kate on Conservation.


These lemur-themed masks support one of Madagascar’s leading conservation charities in their innovative mask exchange scheme to help supply face coverings to the world’s poorest.

The post Lemur themed face masks: giving back to the world’s poorest appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Every single purchase of one of these lemur-themed masks supports the efforts of one of Madagascar’s leading conservation charities in their innovative mask exchange scheme.

By now we’ve all seen the heartbreaking images of discarded disposable face masks making their way into rivers, wild habitats and the ocean. There’s no question that while face masks remain mandatory, reusables are the way forward.

Well, now you can also help five people in the poorest country in the world by buying a reusable mask like this one.

With everyone from Aldi to Adidas offering face masks for sale, there are a plenty of options available, but an innovative UK charity, SEED Madagascar, have an unmissable deal – buy one, get five free.

Who are SEED Madagascar?

SEED Madagascar are an environmental and humanitarian charity working to help both the people and animals of the African island. Their projects range from school and toilet building to improving primate habitats and protecting turtle nesting sites. Coronavirus is now causing additional challenges however.

Madagascar and Coronavirus

Madagascar is the poorest country in the world, with almost 80% of the population living on less than $1.90 per day.

Whilst coronavirus is impacting us all massively, on the island there are few health services, many people’s immune systems are already compromised, mortality rates are among the worst in the world and communication systems, to tell people about the virus and how to avoid it, are poor.

It is predicted as much as 10% of the population may die from the virus.

Face masks on the island are therefore vitally important to help prevent the spread of CV and are relatively cheap to produce.

How the iconic ring-tailed lemur is helping

Thus SEED Madagascar have come up with an innovative way to help fund their production and distribution to some of the most vulnerable; they are selling face masks, produced in the UK, for £5 (with a new design launched featuring one of Madagascar’s most famous inhabitants, the ringed lemur).

The funds from the masks’ sales then goes towards commissioning 5 masks to be made by skilled community members in Madagascar.  One pound covers the cost of materials, labour at 2.5x the minimum wage, and distribution of a single mask. 

“We can’t over estimate how vitally important helping those in Madagascar with the spread of CV is. It’s been difficult controlling the virus in rich developed countries, so it’s terrifying to think about what the final toll might be in poor developing countries.” – Mark Jacobs, SEED Madagascar Director

Click here to buy a lemur mask and support the project

You can also help by volunteering to create face masks for sale in the UK – visit here for details.

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Learn more about Covid-19 in connection with wildlife

  • Wildlife Trade laws must be reformed with ‘One Health’ approach
  • Re-imagine nature: 6 ways to prevent the next pandemic
  • Ecotourism as a Philosophy for Conservation
  • End Wildlife Crime: New initiative presented at the House of Lords calls for an International Agreement

Covid-19 and animals in captivity

  • Coronavirus outbreak and animals in zoos
  • Creature Discomforts: Life in Lockdown
  • How to Change the World One Moon Bear at a Time

Coronavirus and UK Nature

  • HS2 and the UK’s post-lockdown challenges
  • The hidden truth behind the UK’s tree-planting hypocrisy

My personal experience of UK lockdown

  • Lockdown no more. My birthday wish at 30
  • Winners of the 2020 ‘Green Oscars’ announced
  • Connecting with nature by building a lockdown garden
  • Eastern Daily Press newspaper celebrates our lockdown garden
  • Lockdown: live interviews, podcasts, awards and articles
  • Have an Ethical Easter (and win yummy guilt-free treats!)
  • How to turn a wildlife blog into a career

The post Lemur themed face masks: giving back to the world’s poorest appeared first on Kate on Conservation.


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