Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

Your Connection to Wildlife

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A blog about ecology and wildlife conservation

The ecosystem services blog

Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

World's diverse ecosystems

Birdfair: A look back at ‘next generation conservation’

Ahead of Virtual Birdfair 2020, take a look back at the Next generation conservation debate: Should Nature Work for Us Or Should We Work for Nature?

The post Birdfair: A look back at ‘next generation conservation’ appeared first on Kate on Conservation.


Ahead of Virtual Birdfair 2020, take a look back at the Next generation conservation debate: Should Nature Work for Us Or Should We Work for Nature?

The post Birdfair: A look back at ‘next generation conservation’ appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

Birdfair 2020 has gone digital! For the first time ever, Rutland Birdfair — the so-called Glastonbury of the animal world — will be hosting an entirely virtual version of its talks and events, available to view online tomorrow (18th – 23rd August) Here.

These talks include the much-anticipated ‘State of the Earth’ Question Time Event on the evening of Friday 21 August from 7.00- 9.30pm; with panellists Dr Jane Goodall, Chris Packham, Lizzie Daly, Craig Bennett, Sir Ian Boyd , Liz Bonnin and Will Travers. As well as the ‘State of the Earth’ Next Generation Question Time Panel with James Miller, Dara McAnulty, Mya Rose Craig, Bella Lack and Sophie Pavelle.

BirdFair is one of my favourite events in the calendar, and of course one of the things I love most (and will miss most about it this year) is meeting so many other like-minded individuals and organisations — and trying to catch a glimpse of the marvellous ospreys on the Rutland Reserve, of course!

Next generation conservation debate:

Ahead of tomorrow’s online event, I figured it would be nice to share a video from a panel talk that I was lucky enough to be invited to join at Rutland BirdFair 2018; along side some of the most inspiring young people in conservation; Alex White, Bella Lack, James Miller, Beth Jennings and Georgia Locock; chaired by Dominic Dyer. I hope you enjoy our discussion around whether nature should work for us; or should we work for nature…

Should Nature Work for Us Or Should We Work for Nature?

Thank you so much to Dominic Dyer, Birdfair and my fellow panellists for the wonderful opportunity to speak at the Bird Fair.

Enjoyed this post? Take a look at some more live discussions, debates and podcasts I’ve been involved in 2020.

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Have you thought about starting a blog? 

Have you wondered how a wildlife blog or conservation blog could make a difference in building a career in wildlife conservation or science communication?

My personal experience is that blogging is a fantastic way to build a professional network, gain writing experience and learn about a wealth of issues in depth and in ‘real-time’; as you read and research an abundance of topics to become an expert in your field.

My blog has not only given me the chance to meet and interview many of my wildlife heroes, it’s been a prime topic of conversation in my job interviews for both National Geographic Kids and Discovery Communications, and it’s helped me to come into contact with the right people to become a trustee of my favourite wildlife charity, Born Free Foundation.

Find out more about turning a blog into a career here.

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