Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

Your Connection to Wildlife

Official blog of the Canadian Wildlife Federation

A Rube With A View

A blog about ecology and wildlife conservation

The ecosystem services blog

Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

World's diverse ecosystems

Feeding the birds in your garden: Kennedy Wild Bird Food guest post & prize giveaway

This week, Kennedy Wild Bird Food share their thoughts on the arrival of spring, and how March can often be a deceptive month, with its spells of warmer weather.

The post Feeding the birds in your garden: Kennedy Wild Bird Food guest post & prize giveaway appeared first on Kate on Conservation.


This week, Kennedy Wild Bird Food share their thoughts on the arrival of spring, and how March can often be a deceptive month, with its spells of warmer weather.

The post Feeding the birds in your garden: Kennedy Wild Bird Food guest post & prize giveaway appeared first on Kate on Conservation.

This week, Kennedy Wild Bird Food share their thoughts on the arrival of spring, and how March can often be a deceptive month, with its spells of warmer weather.

In this guest blog post, they answer the question “Are garden birds nesting too early this year?” and suggest the best ways to help our garden visitors to feed over the next few weeks…

Nesting garden birds

With the mild weather and everyone thinking about spring, it begs the question, are the wild birds nesting early this year?

There is such a thing as an official nesting season, this is defined in the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981 as 1st March to 31st July inclusive.

The reason for this legislation is to protect the wildlife and bird life whilst they are nesting or roosting.

Although birds do start prior to and continue beyond these dates, it is worth knowing, as you will see a lot of hedge cutting and laying during February, but it is illegal for farmers to continue to do this if it disturbs nests, beyond 1st March.

There is quite a lot of evidence to suggest the wild birds in your garden are starting to make their first nest and seek the partner to share it with, although this is not particularly early for some (Blackbirds begin in early February normally) Chaffinch, Great Tit and Nuthatch all start to pair up in February.

Many other species are starting to fight for territory now and so you will see them squabbling and tussling with each other; gathering nesting material — like twigs, moss, wool etc. — and placing it in a likely spot for a nest.

Don’t worry if the nests you see are not occupied, these first attempts at nest-building are usually just for practice or to entice a prospective mate to share a nest.

Are the birds nesting early this year?

To answer the question about early nesting season this year, I do not think it is particularly early.

It may be a few days or so, but each year is different and although some people think it is Spring already, I prefer to wait another couple of weeks before declaring winter finished.

In our garden we have Snowdrops in full flower and Daffodils just starting to show yellow, but it is still possible for a late cold spell and so we do recommend that you continue with your Winter feeding regime until mid March.

The garden birds still need a boost to maintain winter energy levels and the onset of the breeding season means they will be using lots more energy building nests and showing off to each other.

Top feeding tips from Kennedy Wild Bird Food

If you are thinking of ordering more wild bird food in the next few weeks, we highly recommend our Suet special blend for the month of March.

Our many and varied mixes and blends are designed to provide all the garden birds requirements for the spring and summer months — with many containing fruit and suet for nutrition and energy.

In conclusion, it is a lovely surprise to see an early Spring but be aware of a late cold spell and the effects that may have on your garden wildlife, let nature take its course and enjoy the show!

WIN! A bundle of Kennedy Wild Bird Food worth £50!

TO ENTER: If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning ALL of the Kennedy Wild Bird Food’s seed bags pictured above, PLUS a bird feeder to get you started on your bird watching journey — simply answer the question: What is your favourite bird to see in the spring time?

Leave your answer in the comments below by 30th March 2020. One lucky winner will be chosen to win this prize bundle, and notified on 31st March 2020. Good luck!

About the Author

Kennedy Wild Bird Food are a family run wild bird food and wild bird seed supplier based in rural Lincolnshire. They supply only the finest quality products.

Choose from their vast range of premium products and nutritious wild bird feed.

Kennedy Wild Bird Food are happy to offer advice by phone or online about helping the birds in your garden.

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The post Feeding the birds in your garden: Kennedy Wild Bird Food guest post & prize giveaway appeared first on Kate on Conservation.


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