Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

Your Connection to Wildlife

Official blog of the Canadian Wildlife Federation

A Rube With A View

A blog about ecology and wildlife conservation

The ecosystem services blog

Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

World's diverse ecosystems

COSEWIC Announces 21 Newly Assessed Species-At-Risk

This past week the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) released the results of its November species assessment. In this most recent COSEWIC review, 21 unique Canadian flora and fauna were added to the national list of species at risk of extinction in categories ranging from “Special Concern” to “Endangered”. Given... Read more »

The post COSEWIC Announces 21 Newly Assessed Species-At-Risk appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.


This past week the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) released the results of its November species assessment. In this most recent COSEWIC review, 21 unique Canadian flora and fauna were added to the national list of species at risk of extinction in categories ranging from “Special Concern” to “Endangered”. Given... Read more »

The post COSEWIC Announces 21 Newly Assessed Species-At-Risk appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.

This past week the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) released the results of its November species assessment. In this most recent COSEWIC review, 21 unique Canadian flora and fauna were added to the national list of species at risk of extinction in categories ranging from “Special Concern” to “Endangered”. Given the unique habitats and wealth of species biodiversity in our province, the largest proportion of these species can be found right here in British Columbia.

Of the 8 newly recognized species-at-risk occurring in BC, the Western Harvest Mouse’s megalotis population, Great Basin Spadefoot toad, Slender Yoke-Moss, and 3 species of Sculpin are found nowhere else in Canada. In particular, the Slender Yoke-Moss’s entire global range is known to occupy a single square meter of limestone cliff on Haida Gwaii. While the Great Basin Spadefoot’s range extends widely into the United States but the the species is experiencing rapid habitat loss in its northern habitat due to increased human development throughout the Okanagan Valley. These decreasing populations are indicative of the wider threats facing species and habitats across British Columbia and the world. Through the Habitat Acquisition Grants program the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation (HCTF) helps conservation organizations and communities protect and maintain vulnerable habitats throughout BC. Securing important and increasingly under pressure habitat types (such as wetlands & grasslands) is an important first step in giving species-at-risk and the ecosystems they occupy the opportunity to recover.

This newest list of assessed species is notable for the abundance of smaller, less well studied species. Although we typically hear about more charismatic species such as caribou and other large mammals it is important to recognize that British Columbia (much like the rest of the planet) is experiencing general biodiversity loss among all species. When developing conservation projects and planning habitat protection efforts it is important to remember that each species in a habitat has an important role to play within the larger ecosystem. Loss of biodiversity in any given ecosystem can significantly impact that habitat’s ability to resist threats and impacts of climate change.

For more information on the efforts being taken to conserve BC’s unique and diverse ecosystems, as well as tips on how you can get involved in efforts to conserve habitats and species in your own backyard stay tuned to the HCTF’s blog at https://hctf.ca/blog/.

The post COSEWIC Announces 21 Newly Assessed Species-At-Risk appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.


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