Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the numerous and diverse benefits that people openly benefit from the natural surroundings and also from properly-functioning ecosystems. Such ecosystems contain, by way of instance, agroecosystems, forest ecosystems, grassland ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems. These ecosystems working properly supplies such matters such as agricultural produce, lumber, and aquatic organisms including fishes and fishes. Together, these advantages have become called'ecosystem services', and are frequently essential to the provisioning of fresh drinking water, the decomposition of wastes, as well as also the natural pollination of plants and other crops. Supporting services comprise services like nutrient cycling, primary production, soil formation, habitat supply and pollination.

Habitat Conservation

Habitat conservation for wild species is among the most crucial problems facing the environment today - both in the sea and on land. As human populations increase, land usage grows, and wild species have smaller distances to call house. Over fifty percent of all Earth's terrestrial surface was changed because of human activity, leading to extreme deforestation, erosion and loss of topsoil, biodiversity loss, and even extinction. Species can't survive out their normal habitat with no human intervention, like the habitats within a zoo or aquarium, such as. Maintaining habitats is vital to maintaining biodiversity. Migratory species are especially vulnerable to habitat destruction since they have a tendency to occupy more than a natural habitat. Changing a natural habitat slightly may bring about a domino effect that hurts the whole ecosystem.

Supporting services

While scientists and environmentalists have discussed ecosystem solutions implicitly for a long time, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) from the early 2000s popularized this idea. Additionally, ecosystem services are grouped into four broad classes:
Supporting services
Provisioning

like the creation of water and food

Supporting services
Regulating

like the control of disease and climate

Supporting services
Encouraging

including nutrient cycles and oxygen generation

Supporting services
Ethnic

such as recreational and spiritual advantages

Your Connection to Wildlife

Official blog of the Canadian Wildlife Federation

A Rube With A View

A blog about ecology and wildlife conservation

The ecosystem services blog

Analyses and comments on the science and practice of ecosystem services and biodiversity

World's diverse ecosystems

Just in time for Halloween, it’s Bat Week!

As Halloween approaches, bat enthusiasts around BC are celebrating and supporting bats by participating in International Bat Week (October 24-31). Bat Week is all about appreciating these amazing animals and their benefits, from eating insects to pollinating the agave plant used to make tequila. Take a moment to learn about the many ways bats contribute... Read more »

The post Just in time for Halloween, it’s Bat Week! appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.


As Halloween approaches, bat enthusiasts around BC are celebrating and supporting bats by participating in International Bat Week (October 24-31). Bat Week is all about appreciating these amazing animals and their benefits, from eating insects to pollinating the agave plant used to make tequila. Take a moment to learn about the many ways bats contribute... Read more »

The post Just in time for Halloween, it’s Bat Week! appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.

As Halloween approaches, bat enthusiasts around BC are celebrating and supporting bats by participating in International Bat Week (October 24-31).

Bat Week is all about appreciating these amazing animals and their benefits, from eating insects to pollinating the agave plant used to make tequila. Take a moment to learn about the many ways bats contribute to our lives, and what you can do locally for bats, at www.batweek.org or through the BC Community Bat Program at www.bcbats.ca.

“Bats in BC help control agricultural and forest pests, as well as mosquitoes in our yards – but now bats need our help” says Mandy Kellner, Coordinator for the BC Community Bat Program. “The conservation of bats in BC has always been important, since over half the species in this province are considered at risk. With the continuing spread of White-nose Syndrome in Washington State, bat conservation is more important than ever.”

White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a disease caused by an introduced fungus, first detected in North America in a cave in New York in 2006. Since it was discovered, it has spread to 33 states and 7 provinces in North America, decimating bat populations along the way. “Luckily, WNS is not yet in BC” continues Kellner, “But we are preparing for its arrival by raising awareness about bats, working with landowners who have bats in buildings, enhancing bat habitat, and monitoring populations.”

Monitoring for WNS in BC will continue this winter, with Community Bat Programs requesting reports of dead bats or sightings of winter bat activity starting November 1. You can report sightings at www.bcbats.ca, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or 1-855-922-2287.

In partnership with the BC Ministry of Environment, and funded by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, Forest Enhancement Society of BC, Habitat Stewardship Program, and regional funders, the BC Community Bat Program provides information about bats in buildings, conducts site visits to advise landowners on managing bats in buildings, coordinates the Annual Bat Count, and offers educational programs on bats.

To find out more about the BC Community Bat Program, BatWeek activities, and options for helping local bat populations, visit www.bcbats.ca or call or 1-855-922-2287.


Cottonwoods and wetlands: Protecting wetlands and old trees ensures that threatened bat populations have the habitats they need. Photo: H van Oort.

 

 

 

Bat houses offer roost sites when natural features such as old trees are rare. Find details at www.bcbats.ca Photo: V Reznicek.

 

 

 


Cori Lausen glues a transmitter onto a bat in fall which will help locate roosts as well as provide valuable information about hibernation behaviours and physiology, needed to understand how white-nose syndrome may impact bats in BC.Read more about the bat probiotic project: Seeking ways to protect western bats from deadly white-nose syndrome


See CBC’s recent story on the bat probiotics project: Fighting a bat killer: B.C. scientists testing new way to protect against deadly fungus


Find out more about other HCTF-funded bat projects at: https://hctf.ca/grants-support-bat-conservation-education-and-fight-against-white-nose-syndrome/ 

 

 

 

The post Just in time for Halloween, it’s Bat Week! appeared first on Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation.


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